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solar lamps made from bike parts change lives in mali - 18 watt solar led street light

by:Litel Technology     2019-08-02
solar lamps made from bike parts change lives in mali  -  18 watt solar led street light
Cinzana: Mobile Solar Energy-
In Mali, electric streetlights made from old bicycle parts are changing people's lives. Although 90% of people do not have electricity, villagers often work at night to dissipate heat.
The project was the brainchild of Italian architect Matteo Ferroni, who visited 235 kilometres of Segu. (150 miles)
In 2010, in northeastern Bamako, locals noticed that they mainly slept during hot days and worked at night.
"I soon realized how important nightlife is in a community used to flashing flashlights and moonlight," he said on his website.
He noticed that some of the flashlights were oil lamps. -
Except for dangerous work-
Provide a flashing light, which may not be suitable for a butcher or tailor's job.
At that time, he suddenly came up with a simple, mobile alternative, made of recycled metal rods, supporting a rechargeable LED lighting device and connecting it to an old bicycle wheel, which can be easily moved from one place to another as needed.
Today, his invention, named foroba yelen by the local people, means "collective light" in Bambara and has changed the lives of 72-year-olds. -
Kazan Rural Commune, where 35,000 people live.
Alo Kulibali, who booked a street lamp to baptize his newborn daughter, praised the plan, telling AFP that it improved the lives of poor villagers because they could not afford to buy generators or fuel.
The project began in 2011, when Ferroni created the first prototype with an old bicycle.
"Since then, I have worked with local craftsmen to develop its details so that it can be replicated anywhere in Mali.
"The LED unit was developed with the expertise of Italian lighting engineers," he said.
In 2011, Ferroni returned to Mali with his prototype, designed Segou's first mobile light and took it to Sanogola, a village in the community.
He brought local people into contact with the Swiss Foundation, which supports initiatives in the field of sustainable architecture and provides seminars to teach young people how to replicate lamps and lanterns.
Amadou Sidibe, a welder in Segou, makes the main body of the lamp from used bicycle parts, while Aboubacar Dagnon, a tea producer, makes the shell of the LED lamp from recycled aluminium cookers.
"Blackout" is a tool made by local craftsmen for work, social life and community worship. . .
At present, more than 90 lights have been used in 17 villages and 3 health centers, "Ferroni said.
People go to the homes of Isov Dagnon, a resident of Xianshan, to recharge the batteries of the lights, or book a 250-franc unit. (RM895. 11)
Every night, the cost will be used for maintenance.
Each village benefiting from the scheme has a set of four street lamps and a set of 50. -
Watt solar panels at a total cost of 500 euros(RM2,184. 99)
Funded by Eland.
Today, Foroba Yelen meets the needs of many small businesses, but it is also used for funerals and births at the Cinzana Community Clinic.
Although villagers like Arault occasionally need them, others, such as Porter Djanniba Djoni, use them regularly.
He said, "We used to work in the moonlight with a torch on our head, just like hunters. "
Mali is a country with a population of more than 16 million, which has been plagued by long-term blackouts in recent years.
The government reported Wednesday that the country's electricity supply last year accounted for only 45% of its electricity demand.
Bamako's government says Edmund of Mali-
South African Energy Corporation-two-
One third is owned by the state and one third by subsidiaries of Aga Khan Group. -
Currently in crisis, despite the value of the state subsidy of 87, it has not been able to ensure adequate supply. 7mil (RM383. 24mil)in 2013. —
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