Tens years lighting manufacturing experience

ceiling fan pull chain nightlight - stainless steel solar garden lights

by:Litel Technology     2019-07-26
ceiling fan pull chain nightlight  -  stainless steel solar garden lights
To jump to the "Nightlight in Action" video, click here!
Update: I have received a lot of complaints about the aesthetic quality of zipper Nightlight installation and some suggestions that I should put the circuit in the diffuser bowl.
Well, I'm happy to announce that I've redesigned this project to keep the circuit uninterrupted. -of-
Observe and make the pull-up line look better.
Steps 1 to 5 describe rework as starting from scratch, and steps 7 to 10 are the original indicative steps.
The main source of lighting in my bedroom is ceiling fan lamps.
Most of the time I use wall switches to turn on and off lights, but sometimes I get closer to zipper switches, so I use them instead.
The problem is that zippers can't be found in the dark.
Sometimes I find it right away, but sometimes I flail my whole arm and feel like an idiot looking for it.
So I decided to take apart a solar garden lamp and use its light-emitting diode to make the handle of the zipper glow.
When the garden lamp circuit detects that the ceiling fan lamp is off, it uses batteries to power the LED.
When the light is on, the circuit also charges the battery through a solar cell.
Material and Tools Garden Lamp--
Combined Stainless Steel Solar Energy-
Power Supply LED Path Lamp(
Project: 329346 model: 00942)
Zipper with translucent handle--
Port windbrush nickel ceiling fan zipper(
Project: 101858 model: FP5)
Closed 2X AA battery rack--
Radio Room 278-502~30 in (~75 cm)
Winding(30 AWG)--
Radio room 270-
408A scrap copper sheet(
Battery Contact Size)
Heat shrinkable insulation or sewing wire clamp welding JB welding hot glue spray drill cross screwdriver clamp bevel cutter with holes, which can guide me to use this garden lamp.
First, I removed the end of the fixed globe and electronic equipment from the metal tube, and then took out the battery.
Then I removed several sets of screws and removed the electronic components from the housing.
Next, I gently pry the thermally bonded photoresistor out of the mounting hole and remove the excess thermal bonding adhesive.
I used a diagonal cutter to cut the battery lead that contacted the battery.
Then I cut the LED wire so that I could insert it into the handle of the zipper in step 4.
Finally, I unpacked the solar cell to remove it from the plastic support.
To close the circuit, I used a 2X AA closed battery rack.
Because the circuit only needs one AA battery, another space can be used to fix the circuit board.
First, I remove the negative lead and contact of the battery, and then dismantle and weld the positive lead.
I replaced the battery negative wire of the circuit board with the longer wire removed from the battery rack because it was too short.
Then I replaced the LED wiring of the circuit board with a long enough wire to remove it from the housing.
After that, I reconnected the solar cells to the circuit board.
Next, I welded the battery lead of the circuit board to the battery contact of the shell.
I had to use a piece of copper to connect the negative pole.
When welding to battery contacts, do not place the battery in the bracket.
Finally, I widened the hole through which the lead went and removed some of the material around it.
This makes it easier to remove solar cells, photoresin and LED leads from the box.
First, I put the circuit board in an empty battery cell and arranged all the wires so that the solar cells and photoresistors are flat on the back of the battery seat. (i. e.
Twist out the side of the screw. .
Then I glued the photoelastomer to the box with hot glue.
I used double-sided tape to make some confrontations before the edges and corners of the solar cell were thermally bonded.
I also apply hot glue on solder joints to insulate them.
Next, I welded a 2x1 bus to the LED wire of the circuit board.
Finally, I added a little hot glue to insulate and fix the wires.
In order to install the LED in the hole of the metal part of the zipper handle, a bit of material must be drilled out.
This prevents the ball link head from fixing the handle on the traction chain, so it is necessary to use a small amount of JB welding to weld the joint epoxy resin to the handle.
I fix the connector on the handle so that the LED wires can pass through the connector holes.
The epoxy resin needs to be solidified to continue.
Next, I welded two windings onto the legs of the LED to insert them into the handle of the pull chain and reconnect them to a circuit farther away.
I made a black mark on one of the wires to show that it was connected to the cathode.
I insulate the solder joints with hot glue.
After that, I passed the wire through the handle and three heat-shrinkable tubes, which were on the zipper.
Clear heat shrinkage will be better, but I only have green.
Sewing threads can also be used to fasten wires to chains, but they twist the chains more than I like.
If the chain is tightened, it is easiest to connect the wire to the chain.
Once I changed the zipper, I connected it to the light and threaded the wire into the diffuser bowl.
This let me know how many extra wires I have.
Next, I took off the zipper, trimmed the redundant wires, discarded the redundant ones and welded them on two separate pins, the rest.
Then I took a little material from the top of the translucent plastic handle so that it matched the LED very well.
Finally, I inserted a translucent plastic handle.
Installation process is a huge pain, very specific type of diffusion bowl and installation of my ceiling fan.
My ceiling fan has two hands.
One controls the fan and the other controls the light.
The zipper of the control fan passes through the diffuser bowl to install a hole in the hardware.
This hole can only pass through a male head at a time.
I removed the fan zipper from the hole and rewired it so that it now hangs on the side of the diffuser bowl.
Then I connected the modified zipper to Light's zipper connector.
Next, I put two plugs through the holes and connected them to the mother head on the battery bracket.
I had to work in the narrow space of the bowl.
If I connect more wires to the LED, I can connect them outside the bowl and wrap them around the battery bracket before putting the extra wires into the bowl.
The next step is the beginning of the original indicative.
To skip the demo, click here.
Material and Tools Garden Lamp--
Combined Stainless Steel Solar Energy-
Power Supply LED Path Lamp(
Project: 329346 model: 00942)
Zipper with translucent handle--
Port windbrush nickel ceiling fan zipper(
Project: 101858 model: FP5)
Clear the hooks of the battery storage box and remove about 30 inches from the steel plate hook or plug jack(~75 cm)
Wire welded iron welded JB welded hot glue spray drill cross screwdriver clamp diagonal cutter belt, which can guide me to use this garden lamp.
First, I removed the end of the fixed globe and electronic equipment from the metal tube, and then took out the battery.
Put the batteries aside, but don't throw them away for future needs.
Then I removed several sets of screws and removed the electronic components from the housing.
Next, I gently pry the thermally bonded photoresistor out of the mounting hole and remove the excess thermal bonding adhesive.
I use pliers and beveling pliers to dismantle and reconstruct battery contacts.
Finally, I unpacked the solar cell to remove it from the plastic support.
To close the circuit, I used an old, clean battery box.
First, I glued the battery contacts to the box.
I did this because the batteries and LEDs in the circuit were on, so I could make sure that my contacts were in the right position.
Then I cut the lead of the LED to insert it into the handle of the zipper in the next step.
After that, I moved the board connection of the LED to the other side of the board and installed a bucket jack on the back of the battery box.
In this way, the LED can easily connect/disconnect the circuit.
Next, I carefully separated the solar cells from the hot glue attached to their brackets.
Then I welded the solar cells back to the board.
Once I put everything away, I plugged in the battery, closed the box, and glued the bucket Jack and several hooks taken from the trash board hook to the shell with hot glue.
In order to modify the traction chain, I first welded a twisted pair to the leg of the LED to insert it into the handle of the traction chain and reconnect it to a further circuit.
I insulate the solder joints with hot glue.
To insert the LED lead into the handle of the pull chain, I had to drill a bit of material out of the hole through which the chain passed.
Reaming causes the limiter to stop fixing the handle at the end of the chain.
Whether it's because the plug is easily connected to the top of the handle by a little JB welding, before doing this, I pull the LED through the hole and pull it into the metal part of the handle.
Next, I removed a little material from the top of the translucent plastic handle so that it matched the LED very well.
Then I wound the wire around the metal chain and glued it with hot glue.
If the chain is tightened, it is easiest to wrap the wire around the chain.
After removing some redundant wires, I added a bucket plug to the twisted pair.
Finally, I inserted a translucent plastic handle.
The installation process is fairly simple.
I connect the chain to the ceiling fan, plug the ceiling fan plug into the socket, and hang the circuit on the diffuser bowl of the lamp.
In this way, when the ceiling fan lights up, the solar cells can be charged for rechargeable batteries, thereby generating electricity.
When the light goes out, the photoresistor detects darkness and sends a signal to the control circuit to turn on the LED.
You may have noticed that this version does not have the perfect look of consumers. -the-shelf product.
The project was originally a hacker, a hacker-
Concept proof.
But then I modified it to make the zipper look better and hide the circuit board. (see steps 1-5).
I still think hanging the boards outside the diffuser bowl is the best way.
It can make it look better by designing a customized, suspended shell that looks very decorative.
Maybe it's something that looks like stained glass flowers, where the LED wires stretch down the stem to form a zipper that seamlessly integrates the wires.
Rechargeable batteries are supplemented by solar cells, which generate electricity when the ceiling fan lights up.
When the light goes out, the photoresistor detects darkness and sends a signal to the control circuit to turn on the LED. Here's a close-
Video on Light-
Upper handle action.
This is a video that shows how easy it is to find a handle in a dark room.
The last idea was that I was worried about the fire hazard of putting the circuit board too close to the hot light in the diffuser bowl, but after replacing the light with CFL and measuring the temperature in the bowl, I came to the conclusion that it might be safe.
I'm also worried that some part of the circuit will accidentally come into contact with the power supply to turn the zipper on or cause a fire.
However, there seems to be enough room in the bowl, and the structure of the pull switch makes it impossible to accidentally touch the power supply.
However, these risks are real possibilities, and you follow them on your own.
You are responsible for your own safety.
The reason I left the original indicator intact was that I felt it was safer, easier to install and less dependent on specific types of lighting.
If I were to redesign it as a product to sell, I would consider making a new zipper switch, which has an integrated AC-DC converter and a new pull rope that can supply power to the LED in the handle and withstand the wear and tear that has been pulled many times a day for many years.
The idea of a luminous zipper handle has been patented, at least since 2001.
Perhaps in economic circumstances, it is impossible to design it as a safe engineering challenge.
Strangely, after a period of time, even if the battery is still in good charge, the LED will turn off.
Because the original goal of garden lights was to decorate rather than provide lighting, I guess there's a timer that can control the duration of the LED so that it won't glow at night when no one around it appreciates it, but that's just a guess.
In addition, because LEDs emit more light than they need and constantly change colors, they can disrupt sleep.
A solar garden lamp is a better solution to provide lighting throughout the night, coupled with an efficient red LED, which will help protect night vision.
Additional hackers: In the planning phase of this project, I consider using zippers as part of the return section of the LED circuit.
Therefore, I connected the traction chain to the multimeter and selected the conductivity test.
It shows open circuit.
However, when I tightened the chain, the resistance dropped to just a few ohms.
Therefore, if you need a simple on/off stretch sensor, zipper may not be a bad choice.
LinkShow A Solar Garden Lighting Project Combination Stainless Steel Solar Energy-
Power Supply LED Path Lamp(
Project: 329346 model: 00942)
Port windbrush nickel ceiling fan zipper(
Project: 101858 model: FP5)
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